instructional design, learning technology

Adaptive Learning: Benefits and Pitfalls

One of my classes, Trends & Issues in eLearning, recently discussed adaptive learning.

I was a bit worried that our assigned viewing/reading might not give a fully accurate picture of adaptive learning, given that the authors seemed to be in a position where they would benefit from putting rose-colored glasses on their audience. (For example, the author of “What Is Adaptive Learning Anyway?” works for – and is posting on the website of – a company positioned to make money off the uncritical embrace of adaptive learning technology. If there are shortcomings, they aren’t likely to be talked about here.)

To balance this out, I ended up reading an article cited by another student (Johanes, P., & Lagerstrom, L., 2017) as well as this EdSurge article, which helped me better understand both pros and cons.

Continue reading “Adaptive Learning: Benefits and Pitfalls”
instructional design, learning technology

Design a “Choose Your Own Adventure” Tutorial WITHOUT Getting Yourself or Your Learners Lost

So you want to build a “choose your own adventure” eLearning tutorial?

“Branching scenario” tutorials follow a choose-your-own-adventure style of learner engagement, giving learners options and requiring them to make a decision.

Each decision takes the story down a different path, branching again and again until they reach a conclusion. Learners are in the driver’s seat the whole way.

Example flowchart for a branching scenario. Start at left, make decisions leading to different paths, with six possible endings.

As anyone who’s ever read a Choose Your Own Adventure (CYOA) book or played a CYOA game can attest, these can be a ton of fun.

However, if you’ve ever tried to design one – or been unfortunate enough to find yourself participating in one that’s poorly designed – you know that there’s a lot that can go wrong in the execution of a CYOA scenario.

Fortunately, you can increase your branching scenario’s success by incorporating the following steps into your development and design phases.

Continue reading “Design a “Choose Your Own Adventure” Tutorial WITHOUT Getting Yourself or Your Learners Lost”
instructional design

Adding “Know Where” to “Know How” through Connectivism

Here’s some food for thought: Has the internet changed the essential nature of knowledge and learning?

George Siemens and other Connectivists think so. In fact, they argue, modern networks have created new forms of knowledge and learning that have changed the very definition of what it means to learn.

Siemens and his fellow thinkers call this new form of learning “Connectivism.” Continue reading “Adding “Know Where” to “Know How” through Connectivism”

instructional design

Article Review: The Impact of Embedded Interactivity on Video Effectiveness

Welcome to “Article Review”, where I put on my scholarly cap to give an academic article its due in critical analysis.

This week’s article: 

“An investigation of effects of instructional videos in an undergraduate physics course” by Olha Ketsman, Tarequ Daher, and Juan A. Colon Santana Continue reading “Article Review: The Impact of Embedded Interactivity on Video Effectiveness”

diversity and inclusion, instructional design, social media

Article Review: “#Gamergate and The Fappening: How Reddit’s algorithm, governance, and culture support toxic technocultures”

Welcome to “Article Review”, where I put on my scholarly cap to give an academic article its due in critical analysis.

This week’s article: 

“#Gamergate and The Fappening: How Reddit’s algorithm,
governance, and culture support toxic technocultures” by Adrienne Massanari Continue reading “Article Review: “#Gamergate and The Fappening: How Reddit’s algorithm, governance, and culture support toxic technocultures””

game design & learning, instructional design

Article Review: “Good Game: On the Limitations of Puzzles and Possibilities for Gameful Learning”

Welcome to “Article Review”, where I put on my scholarly cap and robes to give an academic article its due in critical analysis.

This week’s article: 

“Good Game: On the Limitations of Puzzles and Possibilities for Gameful Learning” by Jeremiah Kalir Continue reading “Article Review: “Good Game: On the Limitations of Puzzles and Possibilities for Gameful Learning””